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Thursday, 12 October 2017

His Royal Highness, and supporting cast - on 17th September, 2017

It had been ten days since I'd last visited the Kingfishers, so I decided to return. This time, unlike on my previous two visits which were in 'cloudy-bright' weather conditions, the weather was 'sunny spells'.

I stopped at the first location just as a female Kingfisher was leaving a relatively near post. I sat and watched for a while but she stayed at the far end of the pond, only landing when out of sight. She soon flew off to the nearby brook.

As I made my way to the second location there were a few Common Darter dragonflies around. 

Common Darter (Sympetrum striolatum) (female) - Leicestershire
I arrived at the hide to find two people who had spent all morning there and only got a fleeting glimpse of a Kingfisher - it was looking as if I might not be lucky.

Because of the relatively warm sunny weather there were a few dragonflies visible from the hide. This one perched conveniently close.

Common Darter (Sympetrum striolatum) (male) - Leicestershire
In the event, I only had to wait just over half an hour before a male Kingfisher arrived and obliged by landing quite close to the hide - although the sun had gone behind a cloud.


Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) (male) - Leicestershire
On my first visit, a gentleman who voluntarily looks after the site had commented that he'd like to find an alternative stick to one of the ones that were in place for the Kingfishers to perch on as it was a bit smooth and shiny. On my subsequent visit, I'd taken with me what I hoped would be a suitable stick, and left it for him to do with as he wished. I was, therefore, delighted to see that 'my stick' was now in place and being used to advantage. Here's one of the Kingfisher on 'my stick'.

Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) (male) - Leicestershire
 From its texture, you might recognise 'my stick' in some of the subsequent images.







Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) (male) - Leicestershire
The bird spent a full 15 minutes here before departing to the brook. I waited for another hour, but it didn't return in that time. However, I did take a few other shots. Here's one of a Migrant Hawker dragonfly which landed on 'my stick'.

Migrant Hawker (Aeshna mixta) (male) - Leicestershire
 A Wren briefly landed on one of the other 'kingfisher sticks'.

Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes) - Leicestershire
Mute Swans might be everywhere, but there's no denying that they are among the most graceful of birds. I couldn't resist the photographic conditions at one point.



Mute Swan (Cygnus olor) - Leicestershire
The weather started to change dramatically and so I set off towards my car. I had to take refuge for half an hour in another hide when there was a sudden torrential rain shower. I then made my way home.

It had been another enchanting interlude with the Kingfisher. I have another post up my sleeve  on the subject of Kingfisher and that one will be a little different.

Thank you for dropping by. My next post will probably feature dragonflies, and maybe another bird. 

22 comments:

  1. Oh wow I am sooooooo jealous of those kingfisher photos they are superb, bravo. The little wren is also fabulous and the swan with the reflection, brilliant. I have to admit that the dragonfly shots are also excellent, but the birds just make me happy and leave me with a smile on my face.
    Take care and have a good remainder to the week. Cheers Diane

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    1. Thank you for those very kind words, Diane.

      Have a great weekend. With my very best wishes - - - Richard

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  2. Lovely Kingfisher images Richard and on your stick too. What a bonus. Even better that a Migrant Hawker should also land on it. Let's see if you can get a Common Darter on it then. Now there's a challenge.

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    1. Thank you, Marc. I did get a Common Darter on the stick too, but the photo was even worse than the one of the mixta - just too far away!

      Common Darter still around up here.

      Best wishes - - - Richard

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  3. Hi Richard: Had some close encounters with Common Kingfisher here in Croatia two days ago. Fabulous bird. And yes, we did get to see Wallcreeper - and great looks too, for several minutes. Slovenia and Croatia are both fabulous places to visit. Back home in another week.

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    1. So pleased that you too have had good sightings of these wonderful birds. Very envious of your Wallcreeper, however!

      I just knew you'd enjoy Slovenia and Croatia. I'd just started bird watching when I last visited and was tied up, as I was there 'on business' anyway, so only had a sniff of their potential.

      If no communication before a week's time, have a safe journey home.

      Best wishes to you all - - - Richard

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  4. A perfection in any words, again it is the Kingfisher, he is gorgeous photography.

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    1. Thank you, Bob. Best wishes - - Richard

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  5. Hi Richard! How wonderful pictures, absolutely amazing! Best regards

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    1. Thank you, Anne. Best wishes - - Richard

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  6. You have the market for Kingfisher images sown up. These are as good as they can get. I only ever see them sitting in a burrow in the dark or whizzing about at mach2.

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    1. I usually only see them as blue blurs, Adrian - and I rarely see them at all! These were, by far, the best opportunities I have ever had, and possibly will ever get, so I had to try and make the most of the situation.

      Best wishes - - - Richard

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  7. It seems to like your new perch Richard and a very obliging pair.

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    1. It seems that they've got totally used to the whirr and clatter of camera shutters, Doug. I'm not sure how durable that stick will be - time will tell.

      Best wishes - - - Richard

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  8. Oh gee!! Now you're a happy man, interacting with royalty... The Queen should watch out! LOL!
    N°4 of the kingfisher's series made laugh: so many times did I rail about leaves or blades of grass criss-crossing in front of the head or worse... the eye!
    Well done Richard :)
    I hope you're enjoying the indian summer we are having here.
    Warm hugs to share with Lindsay :)

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    1. I took that No.4 of the Kingfisher set for a bit of fun, Noushka, as it shows a 'real life' situation with the bird far away and doing its best to be difficult. I was also quite pleased that I managed to get it in focus in spite of the intervening foliage. I'm delighted to hear it amused you too!

      The indian summer that we've just started only stretches to it being rather warmer. It's cloudy and rather too windy to be useful for much. I did get out for the day yesterday, however, and even managed to get some shots of dragonflies in the rain!!!

      With my very best wishes. Take good care - - - Richard

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  9. Another great post Richard,love the Kingfisher shots,also like your new prop,the stick served it purpose well.
    John.

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    1. Thank you, John. I'm hoping to return to this place soon. I wonder what I'll find there?

      Best wishes to you and Sue - - Richard

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  10. Hello Richard,
    the patience has paid off for these photos.
    Nature shows us their most beautiful animals you were in the right place
    Kingfisher pictures of the finest ...
    Greetings Frank

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    1. Thank you, Frank, for those kind words of encouragement. With my best wishes - - - Richard

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  11. A beautiful post with the kingfisher as a "eye catcher".
    Really beautiful clear and sharp pictures of this beautiful bird.
    Also the dragonflies are pretty sharp. The swan and winter king are amazing.

    Regards, Helma

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    1. Thank you for your kind words, Helma.

      With my best wishes - - - Richard

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