Notes on Use of This Blog


1. I have a policy that I always reply to comments on my blog, even if it's just to say thank you.

2. Please don't submit comments that include your own web address. For obvious reasons, they will not be published.

3. I'm now on Twitter - @RichardPegler1

Wednesday, 10 October 2012

Red October Captured! - on 6th October, 2012

My much-photographed Little Owl Site No.02 on my local patch has the owls nesting in a derelict barn which is increasingly covered in Virginia Creeper. In the autumn (fall) the leaves of the creeper turn red over a matter of just a few days and then, just a few days after that, the leaves are on the ground and the effect is gone!

Earlier in the week I had seen that the leaves were just starting to change. On Saturday I went again - the leaves were almost fully changed, an owl was on the chimney, next to some red leaves, and the sun was shining!!!

Little Owl - my Site No.02
I began a gentle approach, and the owl was totally unfazed - I'd caught it in a confiding mood. I managed some reasonable close ups, one of which is below, but I still think the top image captures the scene better. The owl was still in the same place when I left.

Little Owl - my Site No.02
WARNING!!! The farmer here is becoming increasing upset by the number of people that have found this site, and are taking liberties - either by trespassing on his land or parking in front of his gates and blocking access. Be aware that the farmyard is only a short distance away, and this site is in view of it. Also, particularly at this time of year, the farmer passes this site on a 'several times a day' basis. It's only a matter of time before he takes action. I am fortunate enough to have his permission to wander freely, and the above images would not have been possible without this permission.

I've not done a lot of owling lately, and what I have done has been largely unfruitful. For example, on this same day, I'd visited my site No.17, arriving just after 7.30 a.m. to find the farmer sorting out his sheep beside the nest site. We chatted for a while, and I then went to set up my hide, not expecting an owl to be out so close to us. It saw me first and bobbed back in. Three hours later it had still not emerged, and I gave up.

My site No. 28 yielded no sightings that day either.

Five sites visited over a four hour period, two days previously, yielded only one sighting, and an image that was not that special! This one flew before I could try and get into a better position.

Little Owl - my Site No.06
Give it a few more weeks and owling will become a little easier. The owls won't be out any more than they are now, but the leaves will be off the trees, so they'll be more visible!

14 comments:

  1. I really like the way it's looking straight at you in the second picture. I have never got a picture of an owl yet, but I have a plan. From Findlay

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Findlay. The chances are that, if you see an owl in the wild, it will be looking straight at you. They like to keep you under observation, often from a hidden position.

      I shan't ask what your plan is, but I shall eagerly await the results! Good luck!

      Delete
  2. I love the first picture with the lovely colour of the Virginia Creeper and the Little Owl.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Linda. That colour, in the sun, was heart lifting!

      Delete
  3. An excellent post with excellent images of the Little Owl. How very unfortunate you found it necessary to add the 'WARNING!!!'....hope everyone takes heed of it Richard.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your kind comments Pete. I'm just hoping that the farmer doesn't take too drastic measures if he continues to have a problem with people. This is just one of the reasons why I am always vague about where my owl sites are located.

      Delete
  4. I totally agree with Pete, your images are gorgeous but how sad people take liberties in private property...
    No wonder the farmer wants to take action; in his shoes I would become quite angry.
    Congratulations, I will nowlook into your previous posts! ;-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Noushka. Fortunately, most people don't cause any problems. It's just the few inconsiderate and selfish ones that spoil it for everyone else.

      Delete
  5. Lovely Little Owl sitting and taking notice of you. Great photos.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I really like both the the top two images Richard. I feel for you (the bit typed in red), we had the same problem at a site at Upton Mill and it ruined all relationships that were had between us and the farmer. If I ever visit such a site it's worth talking to the landowner first, establish wether you can access his land and if he minds and also where to park without being obstuctive, and finally do a few prints, it always help.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Douglas. Virtually all my sites are off the beaten track, and I always seek permission first if I want to stray from public places. Sometimes this can be a little difficult as it's not always apparent who the landowner is, and even then it's not clear-cut as land is often leased out.

      It is standard procedure for me to take my landowners a Christmas present and card - Usually a framed print of an owl on their land, plus the Christmas card featuring another image of a bird on their land, or sometimes a view of their land (snowscenes go down quite well!)

      Delete
  7. Estupendas imágenes y interesante Blog, desde hoy cuenta con un asiduo nuevo seguidor. Saludos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gracias por sus amables comentarios. Saludos desde Inglaterra soleado!

      Delete

I'm pleased to report that the anonymous spam problem seems to be solvable without using word verification. I'm now just using the 'Registered Users - includes OpenID' option in Blogger settings, and I'm not getting any spam - touch wood! I've also not received any contact from people saying that they are no longer able to make comments.