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Friday, 11 January 2013

Garden Brambling - on 9th January, 2013

We've had sightings of Brambling in the Garden just four times so far this winter - better than last winter, when we had none, but not nearly as good as the previous winter when we had up to four birds on a 'several times a day' basis. However, getting photos of them has not been easy, due to bad light, or bad positioning,

On Wednesday we had a visit from this bird, which I believe to be a female - although it might be a winter plumage male? Edit - as the general consensus of opinion is that it's a female (thank you guys), that is what it will be! It is a different bird to the one we had before Christmas as that was (I'm relatively sure) a winter plumage male, with quite a lot of black showing through the grey head plumage. I managed some slightly better images this time than I did of the previous visitor.


Brambling (female) - our garden
Music

My last post featured a number by the Keef Hartley Band. I mentioned that Keef had a spell playing drums for John Mayall until he was famously sacked.

John Mayall was a very big influence on my early musical efforts, and I used to regularly go and see him play in London (I lived in the suburbs of London when I wasn't away at school/college). This is the first track of the first John Mayall album - Live at Klook's Kleek - one of my earliest LPs which I still have.


12 comments:

  1. I agree with Kerri,i think this a Female Richard,not had one in our garden for years.
    Lucky you.
    John.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you John - I won't edit the post just yet in case there is a wave of dissention about it being a female!

      Delete
  2. I've never seen one in my garden, never mind. You have, great. And for the music - you have a great taste in music.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Bob. From the clips on your own post, I suspected that our tastes were not dissimilar!

      Delete
  3. Good garden, good bird, good image. A female by the way Richard.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Pete. I'll now update the post accordingly.

      Delete
  4. Nice pics, Richard!
    I agree about the bird being seen rarely in our gardens!
    And I would also have wondered if it is a colourful female or an immature male, but Pete gave the answer!
    Well she is gorgeous!
    Enjoy your Sunday!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Noushka. I looks like we've got some hard weather coming, so it'll be interesting to see how it affects the birds coming to the garden. Keeping them supplied with water in sub-zero temperatures is a problem which tends to keep me busy!

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  5. What a wonderful sighting for the garden, Richard. Great shots to boot!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Christian. I'm just hoping she returns.

      Delete

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