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Friday, 10 November 2017

Back With The Kingfishers - Autumn, 2017

I really did think, when I published a Kingfisher post three weeks ago and said that I thought it would be "my last Kingfisher post, for this year at least", that that would be the case.

On 30th October, I visited the same Kingfisher location because it can be good for other interesting birds and unexpectedly found a Kingfisher in attendance. I couldn't resist a few more photos of Kingfisher as it was a reasonably bright day. Here are a few from that session.






Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) (male) - Leicestershire
The main interest here during that session was, however, the Water Rail. Unfortunately, although this showed for a while, it remained well-tucked into the phragmites and I only managed a record shot which confirmed the bird by its bill and a small section of its back.

On 2nd November I returned in the hope of seeing the Water Rail, but it didn't show. It was a dull day and the Kingfisher showed again, so I took some more photos although the lack of light made photography difficult for most of the time.









Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) (male) - Leicestershire
On 6th November, it was a relatively bright day, and in considering where I should go I settled for a place near home, but in Derbyshire rather than my own county of Leicestershire. The reason for choosing this place was that it can be good for 'water birds', but also good for passerines. I'd ruled out the Kingfisher location on the basis that I'd like to see something different.

Having parked my car and set off on foot, I found the sight of a Magpie perched on top of the head of a particularly hairy beast to be an amusing sight.

Magpie (Pica pica) - Derbyshire
Arriving at the first viewing platform, I found some distant ducks, geese, and grebes, but nothing to get me excited, until towards me flew - a Kingfisher!! It briefly alighted on a phragmites stem which didn't bear its weight, and instantly flew back up the channel and out of sight.

The next two platforms didn't reveal any more than the first, and I then ended up at the hide, which was still under construction when I last visited. I was greeted with the information that Kingfisher had been showing well and frequently!

The window seats were relatively full, so I sat at the back. When Kingfisher was first spotted in the far distance, I was kindly given access to a window and pointed at the bird. It was too far away and somewhat obscured for a worthwhile photo.

Later it came a little closer and I managed a shot that was still somewhat obscured.

Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) (male) - Derbyshire
After a while, the lady who occupied the prime seat departed, and I moved into that position. I did not have to wait long before the Kingfisher came quite close, but it was behind vegetation. With patience it was possible to get a slightly clearer shot when the breeze moved the vegetation aside. It was a pity that a totally clear shot wasn't possible as the light by then was gorgeous!


Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) (male) - Derbyshire
It soon departed, but came back again a short while later to a place that was a little further away, but relatively unobstructed. Sadly this place was in shade.

Kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) (male) - Derbyshire
From this end of the hide I also had three very brief (about one second) views of a Water Rail as it flew across a 2 metre wide patch of water from one set of phragmites to another. I missed getting a shot each time.

The only other photos I took were of a very distant Common Snipe - not worth including here.

I gladly gave up my seat to newcomers to the hide, and set off back to see if I could find an owl - I did, but didn't get any photos as it was too dark and my car, in which I was sitting, was facing in the wrong direction anyway.

At this point in time I have absolutely no idea what my next blog post will feature.

Thank you for dropping by

21 comments:

  1. I think that everyone will agree with me that your obsession with this kingfisher is entirely understandable!

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    1. I'd not really thought of it as an obsession, David. Now I'm worried! ;-}

      My love to you both - - - Richard

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  2. Keep these coming. I think they are both entertaining and exciting. The flight shot is great now for one incoming.

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    1. Thank you for that encouragement, Adrian - much appreciated. With my best wishes - - Richard

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  3. Amazing photos and I am so glad you went looking for the kingfisher again. Just love the magpie on the head of the hairy beast, LOL great shot. Enjoy the weekend Diane

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    1. Thank you Diane. I don't feel quite so guilty now about posting on Kingfishers once more!

      I'm having a quiet weekend this week. Out to buy a berry tree for the birds this morning. Going to have a day trying my hand at leathercraft tomorrow!

      My very best wishes to you - - - Richard

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  4. Hello Richard, and I am sure you will go back again. Once you are hooked you Always want to go back for that one picture you have in your mind. The captures you made are most wonderful.
    Regards,
    Roos

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    1. Thank you for those very kind words of encouragement, Roos. I hope I will be back with the Kingfishers sometime soon, but I don't think I'll get away with yet another post on these fabulous birds without giving it a rest for a few months!

      Keep well, and take good care. With my very best wishes - - - Richard

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  5. Hi Richard! Lovely pictures of the mighty bird. Best regards

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    1. Thank you, Anne. Best wishes - - - Richard

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  6. You are a Kingfisher friend, yes Richard, these are splendid, how do you get one?

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    1. I guess I do rather like Kingishers, Bob. They are such amamzing birds. I am lucky that, after many years with only brief views of a flash of blue, I have now got two locations close to my home where they can be seen. It will not be like this forever, however!

      My very best wishes - - - Richard

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  7. Hello Richard
    such a great and detailed series of one
    I have not seen kingfisher for a long time.
    Congratulations to this professional work
    Greetings Frank

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    1. Thank you for those very kind words, Frank. For many year I only had distant brief sightings of Kingfisher, but this autumn I have been very lucky.

      With my best wishes - - - Richard

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  8. What s delight to see more King of the Fishers,can never see enough of these wonderful Birds.
    Love the flight shot,but my favourite images are shot 4 and 5,superb.
    John.

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    1. Thank you for your kind words, John, which are much appreciated.

      My best wishes to you both - - - Richard

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  9. Again another fantastic bunch of. Kingfisher images, they're either slowing down for us or we're getting quicker, no more blue blurs :-)
    Have to say the Magpie steals it for me though purely on humour. I'm surprised you got that close looking at them horns!!

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    1. Definitely a case of them slowing down for us, Doug! No chance now of me ever getting quicker! That horned beast was probably about 50 metres away, and there was a sturdy fence between us!!

      With my best wishes - - - Richard

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  10. Fantásticas fotos del martín pescador, son realmente magníficas. Enhorabuena Richard, saludos desde España.

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    1. Gracias por esas amables palabras, Germán, que son muy apreciadas. Los mejores deseos - - - Richard. (¡Espero que Google Translate tenga sentido!)

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  11. Hello Richard!
    Back at last into the blogosphere, got reconnected this morning!
    WOW, 3 weeks in isolation is very long!
    Great photos of this lovely kingfisher, I can well understand how thrilled you can be every time you see one.
    On the other hand, the magpie on the calf's head is not really amusing to me when I know what corvids can be up to... One starts to peck a week spot on an animal until it finally draws blood and others fly in to worsen the wound. On a more or less long run the animal is weakened and some individuals may die. I know for I've seen it with crows in my area. A bit like gulls with whales... Sad stories.
    Anyway, I loved you post :))))
    Keep well and take care!

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